(Welling. Kent)
07919 356980
Lesson Guide -You do Something to Me
Any questions - just ask
Backing Track
TAB & ‘one to one’ tuition available to members
Sample - You do Something to Me (edited)
John’s notes: Although a Paul Weller fan, when a fellow member suggested I checked out “you do something for me” as an instrumental project I was originally sceptical. But within a few bars I was sold. It’s got a great chord structure and a bluesy melody so didn’t take long to work out an arrangement using only the E minor scale. This is a good example of when the harmony chords are flowing by quickly (mostly 3 chords per bar) it’s not really practical to create a melody ‘chasing’ the chord tones. So careful use of notes within the E minor scale works best. Also, I have not added numerous “fills” in between gaps in the melody instead allowed the melody to ‘breath’ as per the original tune. Another example that ‘often less is more’ ! This arrangement uses standard techniques most members will be familiar with (bends, hammer on’s, pull off’s, slides etc) so should not be too much of a challenge. Just listen (or watch) the video of me playing, and listen to the backing track a few times before attempting to play along with it. Why not experiment playing your favourite ‘licks’ (phrases) in the key of E minor or G Major to see if they work over the backing ? I think this arrangement does justice to the original melody and suits the guitar well. For ballad lovers this should definitely be part of your ‘set’ list…..Enjoy!
(Welling. Kent)
07919 356980
Any questions - just ask
Lesson Guide - You do Something to Me
Backing Track
TAB & ‘one to one’ tuition available to members:
Sample - You do Something to Me (edited)
John’s notes: Although a Paul Weller fan, when a fellow member suggested I checked out “you do something for me” as an instrumental project I was originally sceptical. But within a few bars I was sold. It’s got a great chord structure and a bluesy melody so didn’t take long to work out an arrangement using only the E minor scale. This is a good example of when the harmony chords are flowing by quickly (mostly 3 chords per bar) it’s not really practical to create a melody ‘chasing’ the chord tones. So careful use of notes within the E minor scale works best. Also, I have not added numerous “fills” in between gaps in the melody instead allowed the melody to ‘breath’ as per the original tune. Another example that ‘often less is more’ ! This arrangement uses standard techniques most members will be familiar with (bends, hammer on’s, pull off’s, slides etc) so should not be too much of a challenge. Just listen (or watch) the video of me playing, and listen to the backing track a few times before attempting to play along with it. Why not experiment playing your favourite ‘licks’ (phrases) in the key of E minor or G Major to see if they work over the backing ? I think this arrangement does justice to the original melody and suits the guitar well. For ballad lovers this should definitely be part of your ‘set’ list…..Enjoy!