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A Dollar A Day (A Working Man’s Blues)
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TAB: A Dollar A Day
The Blues originated from the African slaves transported to America and other countries to work in the cotton and sugar plantations as well as hard labour working on laying railroad tracks, and mining for Tin and Gold. These men and women would sit around their camp fires at the end of hard gruelling days and sing songs of home and missing loved one’s. The songs were usually based on a simple rhythmic 1-4-5 chord structure built around dominant seven chords. One person would start singing a melody line, others would join in tapping their food bowls and wooden stools whilst others would sing in response to the main melody line. Much like the gospel singers of today. All spontaneous, nothing formal, and full of emotion! This Blues tune is in the key of A Major. You will notice there are some notes in the melody ‘outside’ the A Major scale, this is common with Blues and is part of it’s character. After all, Blues is the grandparent of Jazz, hip pop, rock, rhythm and blues, country, and so many more genres! Try to create a slow steady rhythmic pulse throughout the tune. The guitar ‘slap’ or ‘thump’ technique is common in Blues music, and is used in many styles such as Latin, flamenco, folk etc, and recently in many great guitar solo’s. video password = dd
020 8304 3500
(Welling. Kent)
07919 356980
John Edwards Guitar lesson
A Dollar A Day
Any questions - just ask
TAB: A Dollar A Day
(A Working Man’s Blues)
The Blues originated from the African slaves transported to America and other countries to work in the cotton and sugar plantations as well as hard labour working on laying railroad tracks, and mining for Tin and Gold. These men and women would sit around their camp fires at the end of hard gruelling days and sing songs of home and missing loved one’s. The songs were usually based on a simple rhythmic 1-4-5 chord structure built around dominant seven chords. One person would start singing a melody line, others would join in tapping their food bowls and wooden stools whilst others would sing in response to the main melody line. Much like the gospel singers of today. All spontaneous, nothing formal, and full of emotion! This Blues tune is in the key of A Major. You will notice there are some notes in the melody ‘outside’ the A Major scale, this is common with Blues and is part of it’s character. After all, Blues is the grandparent of Jazz, hip pop, rock, rhythm and blues, country, and so many more genres! Try to create a slow steady rhythmic pulse throughout the tune. The guitar ‘slap’ or ‘thump’ technique is common in Blues music, and is used in many styles such as Latin, flamenco, folk etc, and recently in many great guitar solo’s. video password = dd
020 8304 3500